EU Turns Up The Heat: Threatens to ‘Punish’ British Fishermen

Press release from Fishing for Leave

Fishing for Leave lambasted comments made in the Danish Media following the visit of EU Chief negotiator Michel Barnier to Denmark’s main fishing port Thyboron, saying; “You can keep your “Harshness!! – International law confers Britain full sovereignty and control over all our waters and resources!”

– EU Fishermen say; “Brexit has incredibly big impact on our company and all of Denmark’s fisheries. We rely on getting into British waters, he says, saying that 85 percent of the catch of the species of sand eel caught in Thyborøn takes place in British waters”.

Fishing for Leave spokesman Alan Hastings said; “As much as no British fishermen wishes personal ill on other fishermen, where were the EU tears when our resources robbed and communities decimated?”

“Does no one in the EU feel guilty that you built a future for the EU industry on robbing UK coastal communities of theirs?”

“Time for Michael Gove robustly to defend UK interests so we can rejuvenate our communities that were sacrificed with a detrimental deal that benefited the EU”.

Britain has the formal opportunity under international law to stop fishermen from Denmark and other EU countries fishing in British waters post-Brexit.

But fishermen in the EU, along with Michel Barnier, say such a decision could also have a negative impact on British fishing.

They say the EU would look to close EU markets to force Britain to continue current shares and access that see’s EU vessels catch EIGHT times more fish in UK waters as UK vessels do in EU waters 780,000 tons vs 90,000 tons.

“When it comes to fishing, we will talk about the topics that are directly related. Our access to British waters and their access to our market”, said the EU’s Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier aboard the fisherman Meilsø when he visited fishermen in Thyborøn today (3rd March 18).

 “Monsier Barnier made it clear that there will be a negotiation with EU fishermen’s access to fishing in British waters and allowing British fishermen to sell their products on the EU’s internal market” says DR’s correspondent Ole Ryborg.

At this point, according to Ryborg’s Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen the Danish government; “will help Barnier to be harsh in negotiations with Britain in the fishing industry”.

Fishing for Leave responded to the threat by pointing out that the EU markets dependency on UK fish exports combined with EU losing the ability to catch 60% of the fish in UK waters would only increase EU markets necessity on UK fish.

Alan Hastings from FFL said “What the EU thinks is a position of strength is actually a weakness and that is their dependency on our resources as a critical part of their food supply”.

“This is no different from the cod wars when British vessels lost access to Norwegian and Icelandic grounds but almost immediately UK processors on Humberside started to import fish direct from Norway”.

“Remainers and the EU cite tariffs but when the cost of tariffs is weighed against the £3-4bn worth of resources which we can repatriate this offsets tariffs by a huge margin as UK fishermen will be able to land more of what they are otherwise forced to discard”

Alan concluded “Michel Barnier’s comments are a shot across the bow and the battle to restore our sovereignty & governance of UK waters is very much alive!

“Will the government capitulate to EU demands or stand up for British coastal communities and not use them as an ‘expendable’ bargaining chip for 2nd time in the face of EU belligerence?

“The big question for Michel Barnier is, why should the EU get continued access? The UK provides 50% of waters but EU relative stability only gives us 25% of our fish”.

“Fishing is massively important to UK communities too and the CFP has been an economic, social & environmental disaster. Brexit also allows environmentally and economically decent UK policy where we become equal of Norway & Iceland.”

“Taking back control is an “acid test” Michael Gove for this government in coastal constituencies. Will the government hold fast or face electoral oblivion in areas like Cornwall, Kent, East Anglia, Yorkshire and the NE of Scotland?”

If Denmark can opt out of Europol, so can we

Last Saturday, those of us who attended the Campaign for an Independent Britain’s annual were reminded that anti- EU sentiment is still alive and kicking in Denmark. We were privileged to be addressed by Luise Hemmer Pihl from the Danish People’s Movement against the EU, who explained that Denmark too has taken a semi-detached position within the EU and many Danish people have no desire for further integration.

Among the evidence she quoted was Denmark’s withdrawal from Europol. In a referendum in November 2015, the Danes decided to keep their opt-out from EU cooperation on justice and home affairs issues.

As from 1st May, Denmark will no longer be a member of Europol but thanks to a last-minute agreement, the country  will still have access to EU police agency’s databases.

If Denmark, an EU State, can maintain an independent position on justice and home affairs, then the UK, which is leaving the EU, has no reason to stay in Europol or in the European Arrest Warrant scheme. Whatever the result of the next General Election, we will be continuing to campaign that Brexit must mean Brexit in these critical areas.

Photo by @boetter

Overturning Referendums – it’s the European way.

Sometimes I don’t know how they do it, these politicians. They stand there with straight faces and say things that are not true. They know they are not true, we know that they are not true. And yet still they expect us to believe what they are saying.

Just recently we have seen a great deal of this. One after another pro-EU politicians have queued up to tell us that they are now reformed characters and that they have no intention at all of trying to keep the UK inside the EU. Oh no, of course not.

“There is no serious chance that the House of Lords will block Article 50” Yvette Cooper tells us. Nicola Sturgeon says she is interested only in protecting the rights of the Scottish government. Gina Miller, who launched the Article 50 court case, assures any one who will listen that she is concerned only to establish the proper process for the move.

You can believe them if you wish. Personally, I do not.

Let’s look at how the EU élite have reacted when previous referendums have gone against them.

In 1992 the Danish voted NO to the Maastricht Treaty on European Union. Everyone agreed that democracy was paramount and that the result would stand. Then the EU promised to give Denmark some opt-outs. The slavishly pro-EU Danish government then held a second referendum, which it won.

In 2004 the EU panjandrums agreed the grandly named “Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe”. This sought to sweep away all previous treaties and replace them with a single, unified constitution. That would be a constitution like any other unified state has.

Ratification got under way with Parliaments in several countries pushing it through with big majorities. Spain held a referendum that approved the treaty. Then France held a referendum, which ended with a vote of 55% NO, followed by the Netherlands which gave a resounding 61% NO. Referendums were promptly cancelled in Poland, Portugal, Ireland the UK and Denmark. EU leaders promsied to “respect” the referendum results and called for a “period of reflection”.

That period of reflection ended with the Lisbon Treaty, which was virtually identical to the failed Constitution. This time it was pushed through the French and Dutch parliaments without a referendum. So much for respecting the results.

Then the Lisbon Treaty ran into trouble when referendum in Ireland saw a 53% NO vote. In June 2008 the EU Parliament held a debate on the Irish result. Speaker after speaker declared that they would “respect the result”. But of course, they did not. Just a year later the slavishly pro-EU Irish government held a second vote. This time the EU leaders issued a series of high sounding promises about legal guarantees. This time the Irish voted YES.

So we can see the pattern. If a referendum produces a result the EU does not like, the élites issue high sounding – but utterly worthless – statements about respecting democracy. They they announce a few cosmetic changes and hold a second vote.

I have no doubt at all that this is what is being planned by the Europhiles who were so aghast at losing the British referendum in June. The key difference is that in Denmark, Ireland and elsewhere the national government was obbsequiously pro-EU and could be relied upon both to hold a second vote and to assure their populace that the vague changes were truly wonderful.

Britain in 2016 is different. We have a Prime Minister who has declared that “Brexit is Brexit”. Like her or not, Mrs May and her pro-Brexit administration is all we’ve got to stand a chance of enssuring that our referendum result is not only “respected” but also implemented.

 

Rupert Matthews

Rupert Matthews

Rupert Matthews is a freelance writer and historian. During the recent EU Referendum campaign he served as Campaign Manager for Better Off Out and spoke at meetings from Penzance to Aberdeen, Belfast to Dover. Rupert has written over 100 books on history, cryptozoology and related subjects. He has served as a councillor for 8 years and has stood for both the Westminster and European Parliaments. You can follow Rupert on Twitter at @HistoryRupert or on Facebook as rupert.matthews1.

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European Electorates reject the EU

Among the European Union’s (EU’s) ruling élite, concern is growing as their EU superstate project – to merge the nations of Europe into a federal superstate governed largely by unelected bureaucrats – continues to unravel. Across Europe, disillusioned electorates are responding against this cruel reality being imposed without their consent.

In this country, Prime Minister David Cameron has begrudgingly agreed to a referendum which gives the electorate the opportunity to leave the EU and for the UK to regain independence, sovereignty and democracy. The EU’s increasingly disastrous mistakes, however, are worrying voters in other countries too. Ironically, it is not just in the South of Europe, where a generation and more of young and old have been made unemployed and without hope by misguided EU policies, notably the straitjacket of the Euro, but in the North and the former Eastern bloc countries where enthusiasm for the EU is crumbling.

Danes retain “Opt-Outs” from EU control
In December, the Danish electorate rejected their (pro EU) government’s proposal to end the country’s opt-out from EU domestic and judicial policies. Following its rejection of the Maastricht Treaty (extending the EU’s powers) in a referendum on June 2, 1992, Denmark obtained four “opt-outs” which pertained to the single currency, the EU’s foreign, security, domestic and judicial policies, as well as naturalization laws. Consequentially, Denmark has not joined the Euro, does not participate in the EU’s military policies, and has preserved a certain margin of manoeuvre for its domestic policies beyond EU directives. However, the ECJ has overruled Denmark’s EU agreements at least 79 times despite explicit agreement to the contrary!

This referenmdum delivered the “wrong result” as far as the vast majority of Denmark’s ruling élite was concerned. They still support their country’s complete submission to EU policy. This should come as no surprise. Mr Cameron and our ruling élite take a similar line here – namely, EU rule for their own benefits, not for us, the people who voted them into office.

Euro exit by Finland?
In Finland, the EU project is also becoming increasingly unpopular, thanks largely to problems with the economy. Although the UK’s recovery from the Great Recession has been rather sluggish, at least we have been out of recession for several years now. By contrast, Finnish GDP has dropped 0.6 per cent in the last quarter of this year – more than in Greece. Finnish economists, looking to neighbouring Sweden and Denmark, point out that without the Euro, the crisis could have been prevented.

A citizen’s initiative, campaigning for a referendum on exiting the Euro, has garnered more than 50,000 signatures. Next year, the Finnish parliament must consequently debate returning to the Finnish Markka.

France – the charge of the ‘fringe’ Eurosceptics
The first round of France’s regional elections saw Marine le Pen’s Eurosceptic Front National top the polls in six of the country’s 13 regions and gain 28% of the overall vote – ahead of both the ruling Socialists and former President Sarkozy’s Les Républicains. In the Nord- Pas de Calais region, the FN polled over 40%. The two EU-fanatic establishment parties responded by creating an unholy alliance to keep the FN from power, with the socialists standing down in two regions and, encouraging their supporters to back ‘arch rival’ Sarkozy’s party. Voters may, however see there is little to choose between the two establishment parties, and many chose to vote for Mme le Pen.

France’s system of having a two-stage election prevented the FN gaining power in any region and will prove an even greater obstacle to winning the Presidency in 18 or so months’ time. However, Marine le Pen’s alleged “dédiabolisation” of the party since replacing her controversial father as leader has paid off. Her party may still be seen as a pariah by the leadership of two establishment parties, but much less so by voters. Although she failed to win a region, she gathered over 6 million votes. Whether it still is a “nasty party” is impossible to judge, especially given the enthusiasm of some sections of the media to apply the “far right” label indiscriminately to any political party with an ideology any major distance to the right of Jeremy Corbyn or Josef Stalin.

It is clear, however, that the FN’s anti-EU stance along with its calls to return to the Franc, for tighter controls on immigration and the need for a more cohesive society are clearly seen as necessary by many French voters and economists.

Eastern European and German worries
Pegida, the anti-Islamification movement in Germany, has enjoyed a renaissance since the attacks in Paris. Indeed, Pegida has spawned similar groups in other countries, including the Czech Republic where the country’s president Miloš Zeman spoke at a meeting of a political action group called ‘Bloc Against Islam’. This is part of a trend in several former Soviet bloc countries, including Hungary and Poland, where parties from outside the pro-EU “mainstream” are either in power or are gaining support, with worries about immigration and Islam being major factors.

In the Spectator, Rod Liddle wrote perceptively about Europe’s ruling élites: “It is an irony that the liberals are being vanquished as a consequence of their support for that least liberal of ideologies, Islam.” The growing anti-establishment mood across Europe engendered by fears of terrorism and Islamification will do nothing to bolster support for the European Union, which disingenuously tries to portray itself as rooted in liberal democracy. There is no democracy in the EU whatsoever, as we all know.

In summary, if the voters in an increasing number of member states are either looking at parties other than the fanatical Europhile “mainstream” or else are turning away from “more Europe” altogether, for how long will they and their worries be ignored?

For how long will repressed Western Democracy stay subjugated? When will the tax revolt commence? When will the people cease to co-operate and the member countries cease to permit themselves to be so enslaved that they become ungovernable as they reject the tyranny of Brussels?