It is not just about the Euro. Or the fact we’re having to bailout a currency we chose not to join. It is not the Euro sclerosis – the fact that the trade block we joined in the early 1970s which then accounted for 36 percent of world GDP, will account for less than 15 percent in 2020. It is not even really about the anti-democratic nature of having decisions made for you in Brussels. Today, for example, we learn that unelected and unaccountable Eurocrats want to prevent us from asking if those claiming benefits in Britain are entitled to them.

No. The reason we need to quit the EU is even more elemental than all that.

Put simply, Europe cannot best be organised by deliberate design. From the Common Fisheries Policy to the common currency, being part of the EU means trying to do things according to some kind of “blue print” determined by a Brussels elite. It makes things more or less bound to go wrong. Indeed, the more insulated from public accountability the Euro System has become, the more inept it is.

By withdrawing from the EU, we would make it possible to organise economic and social affairs in this country not by deliberate design from the top down, but more organically and spontaneously. From the bottom up. Instead of common financial service rules, we might instead allow competing exchanges to offer different approaches and see which one works. Rather than a Common Agricultural Policy for millions of farmers, we might, you know, allow millions of farmers to each have their own farm policy for their farm.

In an increasingly networked and interdependent world, the more successful societies are those that allow more decentralised decision making, by harnessing and balancing opposing forces. Britain’s refusal to be reconciled to being in the EU is not ultimately anything to do with flags or anthems. It’s because we know in our bones that it is a daft way to run a whole continent. I suspect it is not only the Brits who will soon be demanding the freedom to opt out.

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farming

Farming

Do I think that British Agriculture could survive outside the EU? Yes, of course I do. After all, this is the country that produced Jethro Tull, the NORFOLK four course rotation, James Watt, Henry Ferguson and of course Guy Smith!

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Fishing

Fishing

British fishing policy is determined by the political imperative of European integration. The objective is to create an EU fishing fleet catching EU fish in EU waters under an EU permit system controlled from Brussels.

The Economy

The Economy

Bernard Connolly is a renowned British Economist, well known for his negative view of the euro. He was actually one of the first insiders to start touching upon the preparations for the euro currency.

Sovereignty

Sovereignty

Membership of the European Union is undemocratic because the European Commission, which is unelected, has the monopoly of proposing all EU legislation which it does in secret. It also has the power to issue regulations which are automatically binding in all member states.

Jobs

Jobs

It has been happening for the past twelve years and continues to slip off the tongues of European Union supporters and spin doctors in newspaper, on television and during broadcast interviews, “3 million jobs depend upon the EU” whilst avoiding, of course, providing evidence.

Trade

Trade

Britain pays direct ‘membership’ costs of £17.4bn, which equate to an annual net contribution of £6.7bn and dramatically rising owing to Tony Blair’s surrender of a sizeable part of the British rebate.

Immigration

Immigration

Britain has given away control of immigration within the EU to the EU, and retains the power only to control non-EU immigration. This has led to huge disparities where Commonwealth citizens with family in Britain struggle to obtain visas whilst EU citizens with little link with the UK can automatically work here