David Campbell BannermanThere are reams of unnecessary red tape in the form of EU laws, such as the Working Time Directive, Agency Workers Directive and related excessive Health & Safety and Employment legislation which bear most heavily on small businesses, the life blood of jobs and the economy, which as cost the British economy many more jobs. Major plants producing steel, aluminum, chemicals and electrical power are being hamstrung by the implementation of excessive and unrealistic emissions targets.

Britain is prevented by the EU State Aid provisions from for example, spending British tax payers money saving a car industry (the EU prevented the UK saving Rover) or more post offices or the Royal Mail or helping a bank to survive. Unelected Commissioners have the power to veto such decisions. EU procurement rules require large contracts to be advertised EU journal which enables foreign contractors to bid for and win contracts that could have gone to British companies thereby reducing our Corporation Tax receipts and increasing our numbers of unemployed.

The ‘Golden Shares’ in major privatised UK companies which prevented them from being sold overseas were banned under EU rules (except for defence companies) causing many important British companies running British infrastructure have been sold to foreign companies.

Britain now has an ‘empty chair’ at the World Trade Organisation (WTO), where we are a member but cannot do any of our own trade deals, as we have surrendered to the EU the power to negotiate all trade deals on our behalf.

The EU is at heart more protectionist and interventionist than the UK and we are unable to negotiate trade agreements with other nations, including emerging economies such as Brazil and China and 13 of the fastest growing world economies in the Commonwealth which would provide more free trade and be better tailored to the needs of the British economy and our exports. The EU’s semi-imperialist ‘Economic Partnerships Agreements’ (EPA’s) have drawn withering criticism from developing nations particularly in Africa and Caribbean and are unfair to these emerging nations.

We are no longer able to set up our own trade agreements with the countries of the Commonwealth which will go from strength to strength. Currently, the Commonwealth numbers nearly 2 billion people and includes 13 of the world’s fastest growing economies. By 2015, the Indian middle class alone will number a staggering 267 million people. Indeed, leading economist Willem Buiter of City Group predicts that India will supplant China to become the world’s biggest economy in 2050. Because of our EU membership, we are unable to seek far more advantageous globalised visions, for example, to pursue the concept of a Commonwealth Free Trade Area.
Extracted from the book The Ultimate Plan B by David Campbell Bannerman MEP

Ireland - The Second Government Brexit position paper

No one wants to return to a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic. Even less does anyone, bar a few fanatics, want to return to the days of “the Troubles”. This much is obvious. Settling the issues relating to what will be the UK’s only land border with the EU has been […]
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Customs: What the Government position paper told us

Today, the Government published its first Brexit position paper, which covers future customs arrangements. It is a short document, only 16 pages long and intended to be a precursor to a White Paper on trade which is scheduled to appear in the autumn. What does it tell us? Firstly, the Government has been talking to […]
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Avoiding the cliff edge?

Brexit news has come thick and fast this past week. While we don’t see the need to comment on every twist and turn, some recent developments have been quite significant. In particular, following reports of disagreements within Mrs May’s cabinet over how “hard” Brexit should be, we are now informed that the Cabinet is united […]
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Look who's talking!

A worthwhile article on rare.us gives us some insight into Brexit by asking “How could so many be furious over a female Doctor Who?”. The answer is, they’re not. The author says “I decided to go in search of this misogynistic outrage mob, only to find that it existed mostly in the imaginations of the […]
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Who will blink first?

Our attention has been drawn to an interesting article which appeared on the Conservative Home website. The author, James Arnell, claims that we in the UK have a different mindset when it comes to negotiations. “In the UK”, he claims, “parties generally start from a position which is more or less reasonable on each side […]
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Cameron's legacy of confusion

David Cameron didn’t expect to lose last year’s referendum and banned the Civil Service from devising any exit strategy. That became an excuse for a nine month gestation period by Mrs. May which delivered only repetitions of “Brexit means Brexit”. The official leave campaign, vote.leave, refused to devise an exit strategy either. The only serious […]
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E50bn EU Brexit bill request – or investing in European Democracy and liberation?

Is there a way the UK can negotiate the EU request for UK funds to help liberate Europe from the EU and boost economic growth? I believe so. What if the UK were to pay money but only in return for the restoration of democracy, self-government and prosperity in Europe? The UK voted to leave […]
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Britain needs to play it smarter

There is some chatter on the web as to whether Brexit can be parked. Personally I don’t see that happening. Call it a hunch but I think the process has taken on a life of its own independent of the politicians and they lack the coherence to influence it in either direction. I can, however, […]
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Michel Barnier's recent speech - some salient points

Either Michel Barnier, the chief EU negotiator for Brexit, is off his head or there are fundamental misconceptions being held by our government’s Brexiteer Big Beasts.  The following is a summary of the most salient points apparently made by Mr Barnier speaking ‘frankly and sincerely’ about Brexit recently in Brussels to the European Economic and […]
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The great trade muddle

“We are leaving the European Union… We are leaving the Single Market… We are leaving the Customs Union.” Theresa May has repeated these phrases on numerous occasions since her Lancaster House speech in January.  Only last week, Steve Baker, the new Brexit minister, insisted that there would be no watering down of the Brexit strategy. […]
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