Would Scotland REALLY want to rejoin the EU after Brexit?

Nicola Sturgeon is currently attempting to create the momentum for a second Scottish independence referendum  – alias “Indyref 2”. The 2014 referendum was described at the time as a “once in a generation” but Sturgeon said last Monday that because the UK voted to leave the EU but Scotland did not, there has been a “change in material circumstances” since 2014 that justifies a second vote. She wants to give Scottish voters the option “to follow the U.K. to a hard Brexit — or to become an independent country.”

“Scotland’s future will be decided not just by me, the Scottish government or the (Scottish National Party),” she said. “It will be decided by the people of Scotland. It will be Scotland’s choice. And I trust the people to make that choice.”

Some recent reports claim that the SNP’s plan for an independent Scotland now involve gaining access to the Single Market by rejoining EFTA rather than trying to rejoin the EU. No doubt we will know more after the party’s forthcoming spring conference this weekend, but given the activities of malign individuals like Tony Blair south of the Border,  it is hard to believe that all Scots – and the SNP leadership in particular – have thrown in the towel as far as membership of the EU is concerned.

Perhaps, however, reality is beginning to dawn on at least some pro-remain Scots that rejoining the EU would be on massively disadvantageous terms because the country would not benefit from the opt-outs which successive British Prime Ministers the UK fought for and which the whole UK currently enjoys.

Were Scotland to overcome concerns in Madrid, which is worried about the Catalan separatist movement, as a new state joining the EU, this would be its fate:-

(a) It would have to adopt  the euro currency  – although this can be deferred somewhat.
Furthermore, what currency would a newly independent Scotland use between leaving the UK and joining the EU? Would it use the euro unofficially like ( say) Montenegro?

What is more, to join the Eurozone,  Scotland’s top- heavy public sector would have to be pruned as vigorously as in the “club Med” countries like Greece where many unemployed people no longer have access to the NHS and long-term unemployed households are on income of only 8.40 euros per day

(b) Scotland would not have the derogations which the UK presently enjoys. For instance, VAT would have to be added to food, children’s clothes, books and house sales. The minimum rate would be 5 per cent. But much, much more would be required to make good the deficit left by the withdrawal of subsidies from England

(c) If there were a strong possibility of a yes vote, financial institutions, pension funds, mutual organisations,  charities and other investors with members and clients in England would have a duty of care to protect them from currency risks, possible exchange restrictions and seizure of money from bank accounts (as happened in Cyprus), as an independent government would quickly become financially desperate. This would undermine the position of the considerable Scottish financial,sector.

(d) Scottish energy policy has been based on selling overpriced “renewable” electricity to England and buying cheap, conventionally produced electricity in the other direction when the wind doesn’t blow.
With the discrediting of the global warming myth, Independence would give England an excellent opportunity to discontinue the arrangement.

(e) The unkindest cut of all. There are already excellent English and Welsh whisky brands which could quickly be expanded and much reduce England’s demand for Scotch whisky.

(f) The much smaller area of Scottish territorial waters and Exclusive Economic Zone (Compared with those of the UK as a whole) would be shared among an unchanged number of EU trawlers, barred from English waters by Brexit.

All in all, the prospects for Scotland if it tries to re-join the EU do look bleak.  It is hard to say how widely these negative impacts are known among the Scottish population – or indeed, by Scotland’s politicians. As mentioned above, it is possible that the SNP’s recent talk of looking at EFTA rather than EU membership may be due to their recognition of  harsh reality of these disadvantages.

However, in the event of any attempt to whip up support for re-joining the EU by the SNP or anyone else, we believe the points set out above need to be widely publicised throughout Scotland. For anyone wishing to start the ball rolling, this helpful website gives a list of all Scottish newspapers, great and small.

Our Chairman demolishes a supporter of the Common Fisheries Policy

Readers of local papers across the country need to keep an eye open for the name C.N. Westerman. This ever-industrious gentlemen bombards local papers across the country with letters in support of the European Union. Indeed, he is so besotted with the EU that he even praises the Common Fishery Policy – one of the most catastrophically badly managed projects of the EU. Even keen Europhiles usually recognise that. The letter below appeared in the Derby Telegraph of 7th March 2017. No doubt he has sent the same letter to other papers. Informed refutation of this nonsense is required

“BREXIT supporters have complained that they are all regarded as ignorant  and stupid by EU Remoaners but that is not correct. People like Michael Gove are quite clever but very untrustworthy. We suspect their motives.

The matter is most openly displayed by those voters of the UK fishing ports who voted to come out of the EU and declared their reasoning that

“it does not suit us”.

Their only motive is to continue to do what they want to do.  We never doubted the sincerity of their short-sighted self interest. But we doubt their wish to protect the oceans for later generations. And the rest of us lose all the industrial EU advantages for the wrong price of a fish supper. Any thought that our oceans, upon which our grandchildren must depend, need to be protected from exploitation, from thoughtless commercial fishing by UK businesses and also by the 192 other nations, makes no impact on their minds. No one nation can save the oceans. It is a stupid thing to say, not just because the speaker is stupid but because he is not honest.

Every child at school should be able to see that the EU offers the best hope for our planet by coaching other nations to grasp the vision of “shared responsibility- for oceans and for air pollution, for a balanced ecology  and the continuation of animal species, for humans being able to live without epidemics and without warfare. It is only after they have left school that the adults’ self-interest comes to endanger their own grandchildren.”

I  responded as below. It is not possible to refute all his points in a single letter of the size likely to be acceptable to a newspaper. (around 250 -350 words)  I ask those with knowledge of fishery matters to respond with other points to  opinion@derbytelegraph.co.uk and wherever else they see this letter – or one like it- published.

 7th March 2017

 Sir,

Of all the EU’s activities the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) must rank as the most damaging for the marine environment and economically disastrous for British people.

 In 1972,  just as Britain’s negotiations to join the EEC were nearly complete, the European Commission announced out of the blue that there was going to be a Common Fisheries Policy. This meant that Britain’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) of waters up to 200 miles away from our shores, or to the median line where countries are nearer, must become a “common resource” for all European countries to fish.

 It was an official secret at the time, but Edward Heath knew that the EEC treaties provided no legal basis for such a policy. It was a try-on. But, having counted up the number of fishermen and constituencies affected, he decided they could be sacrificed. Surely one of the nastiest pieces of premeditated treachery to his own people by any Prime Minister.

 Today I received the following account by a friend whose lifelong career has been designing equipment for trawlers. He writes “On 28 January a trawler was fishing in the English Channel for haddock and whiting…..Good marks had shown up on the sounder and the skipper decided to haul early. He was delighted to see the net bursting at the seams……The delight turned to horror as the first fish on deck were not whiting and haddock but Sea Bass of 2 – 3kg size. As he had no quota for that species, all had to be thrown back dead into the sea. Out of an estimate of 500 boxes, there were 6 boxes of whiting and haddock….”

 So around 17 tonnes of dead Sea Bass polluted the sea. That week the prices were good and the overall value would have been around £175,000, if they could have been landed.

 Not only does the Common Fisheries Policy cause this grotesque abomination but around 60% of the fish caught in our waters go to foreign trawlers. Often they are landed on the mainland of Europe, processed, packed and shipped back to us at much higher prices.

Yet C.N.Westerman thinks this is marvellous because the EU does it. It is up to every Member of Parliament to right this historic wrong.

 Yours faithfully,

 Edward Spalton