Bruges Group event – the future of Britain and the EU

The Future of Britain and the EUThe Bruges Group spearheaded the intellectual battle to win a vote to leave the EU and, above all,
against the emergence of a centralised European state.

Bruges Group Meeting
Tuesday, 19th June
6.45pm for 7pm
Brexit: the Future
The challenge, the opportunities and delivering a real Brexit

With the speakers; Nadine Dorries MP, Graham Stringer MP & Dr Ruth Lea

The speakers;
Nadine Dorries MP
Member of Parliament for Mid Bedfordshire, novelist and broadcaster

Graham Stringer MP
Labour Member of Parliament for Blackley and Broughton and scientist

&

Dr Ruth Lea
Author, economist and broadcaster

 

ADMISSION:
£10 payable on the door or in advance
Including wine, orange juice, mineral water and nibbles

To purchase your ticket visit:
www.brugesgroup.com/shop/events
Or call Robert Oulds on 020 7287 4414
or reply to this e-mail

Alternatively, click here for a form to book your place

AGENDA:
Lectures: 7pm – 8pm
Discussion: 8pm – 8.30pm
Wine and refreshments: 8.30pm – 10pm

LOCATION:
Princess Alexandra Hall, Royal Over-Seas League
Over-Seas House, 6 Park Place, St James’s Street
London SW1A 1LR

Click here for more information

John Major’s hypocrisy

Our former Prime Minister Sir John Major stirred up a storm last week when he suggested that the Government should make the “brave” decision to offer the free vote to “let Parliament decide, or put the issue back to the British people” – calling, in other words, for a second referendum.

Not surprisingly, such words provoked a strong reaction from some Brexit-supporting MPs, with Nadine Dorries calling him a “traitor”, Jacob Rees-Mogg was – characteristically – somewhat more polite, saying “We had a democratic vote and the decision has been taken. And what he is trying to do is overturn that.”

Traitor or not, you don’t need that long a memory to contrast Major’s enthusiasm for a free vote now with his behaviour during the vote on the Maastricht Treaty during his premiership. He imposed a three-line whip to get the bill through parliament and  referred to the rebel Tory MPs as “bastards”.

It’s therefore rather ironic that having denied the public a say or his own MPs a free vote on Maastricht that he has suddenly changed tack.  He claimed  that the public was realising it had been misled and had “every right to reconsider the decision”.

Well, where’s the evidence? There is little evidence of voter regret. Most people DID know what they were voting for.  The problem for Mr Major is that they made a decision he doesn’t like. Even if the government had made better progress in the Brexit talks than the current muddle. he wold still have found something to whinge about.