EU bolshiness has converted a remainer into a leaver!

With thanks to Rev Philip Foster for spotting these two letters in the Daily Telegraph.

Sir,

At the referendum, I voted to remain in the EU. However, after seeing how some of the European leaders and bureaucrats have behaved towards Britain, like petulant children who have had their ball taken away, I am now totally convinced that we should leave the EU.

A J C Gorman, Ickenham, Middlesex

This letter appeared on 3rd May. The previous day, a very interesting letter was printed, written by a German now resident in Switzerland:-

Sir,

Since German unification – about which Margaret Thatcher was rightly very sceptical – the EU has ever more succumbed to the will of a nation that is obsessed with the idea of a Reich. What we are witnessing now is the latest attempt in the form of the German usurpation of an EU that will eventually morph into the Fourth Reich.

For a German of a certain age like myself, this is painful to experience, and one can only hope that the Fourth will last even less time than the Third.

Heinrich Wenzel Randogne, Valais, Switzerland

 

Photo by HonestReporting.com

From Bruges to Maastricht to Brexit

Buffet Dinner with Wine

A Celebration of the Independence Movement from Bruges to Maastricht to Brexit

Tuesday, 6th December 2016 – From 6.30pm

With Andrew Roberts, FRHistS FRSL  an historian, journalist and broadcaster. As well as appearing regularly on British television and radio, Andrew Roberts writes for The Sunday Telegraph and reviews history books and biographies for that newspaper as well as The Spectator. He is a Visiting Professor at the Department of War Studies, King’s College London. Amongst others he is the author of The Storm of War, a look at the Second World War covering historical factors such as Hitler’s rise to power and the organisation of Nazi Germany. Other works include Eminent Churchillians, Salisbury: Victorian Titan, Napoleon and Wellington and , a novel which he has described as “a dystopian vision of what Britain might turn into if it became a minor of a vast protectionist, illiberal, politically correct.” Andrew Roberts is also a member of the Bruges Group’s Academic Advisory Council.

This special reception is to celebrate the Brexit victory and put it in its historical context of the long battle over many decades to restore our sovereignty. This started with Margret Thatcher’s Bruges Speech. She exposed the folly of European centralisation and instead advocated a Europe of democratic, decentralised nation states. It is impossible to overstate the importance of Margaret Thatcher’s Bruges Speech, where she outlined her alternative vision for Britain and Europe. Its effect was dramatic on the debate over Britain’s future relations with the fast accelerating process of European integration. The Prime Minister’s speech was one of vision, clarity and foreboding. With chilling accuracy she predicted the dangers of European integration. Next the Maastricht rebels took up the gauntlet. Their bold sacrifice, defying the government over the Maastricht Treaty, which provided the framework for European government and the establishment of the eurozone, showed to the country the dangers of EU centralisation, the full implications of which are being played out today. Public opinion was coming our way, the genie was out. Brexit was the inevitable consequence.
If you cannot attend the dinner please support the Bruges to Maastricht to Brexit Appeal. The battle to achieve a prompt and effective exit from the European Union must also be won.
Agenda:
Drinks Reception: 
6.30pm – 7pm
Buffet Dinner:
7pm – 8pm
Speeches:
From 7.30pm
Followed by Auction
DRESS CODE: Lounge Suit

Brexit – media muddle and rubbish galore

At first glance, headlines in a number of papers proclaiming “No Brexit until late 2019” sound thoroughly depressing. Has some new hold-up to triggering Article 50 suddenly appeared on the horizon? Not at all. In spite of a spat between Boris Johnson and Liam Fox over whether the Department for International Trade or the Foreign & Commonwealth Office will head up UK foreign policy, Theresa May has insisted that  it is full steam ahead in the preparation for invoking Article 50 early next year and has told the two men to “stop playing games.”

If her plans go according to schedule, the two-year negotiation period would take us to early 2019. Factor in even a short delay in preparing the ground or a mutually-agreed extension to the negotiations and we will find ourselves in the second half of 2019 without having gone through the Brexit door.  With France and Germany both holding major elections in 2017,  it is quite likely that there will need need to be an extension even before the complexities of negotiating a succesful divorce are taken into account. A change of incumbent or government could result in previously-agreed changes having to be revisited if the leadership in either of those countries change – a distinct possibility in France, where President Hollande’s popularity ratings are very low.

Is business going to suffer as a result of June 23rd’s vote?  Well before the referendum, we predicted a short-term blip in the event of a Brexit vote, particularly a drop in the value of sterling. We pointed out that the economic gains were fore the longer term. House prices have fallen in the wake of Brexit, dropping by 2.6% in London and 2% in the South East. Is this a calamity? Ask any first-time buyer about the absurd prices they are having to pay to get onto the housing ladder and you will not hear any sadness on their part.  Another report claimed that businesses had become “pessimistic” as a result of the Brexit vote. Read the article in full, however, and it states that 36%  of companies are planning to increase staffing levels now compared with 40% before the referendum. A slight fall in optimism, but hardly evidence of widespread business gloom.

It is frustrating that some remainers still seem unable to accept that we voted to leave – and with good reason. Avinash Persaud, writing in the Economic and Political Weekly highlights the supposed correlation between voting to leave and lower educational qualification. Those of us with degrees who voted to leave are becoming utterly sick of being characterised as ignoramuses. If anything, the number of graduates who voted for remain is an indication of the woeful inadequacy of our educational system as opposed to any correlation between intelligence and support for the EU.

Mr Persaud, like many other commentators, also links support for Brexit to disenchantment with free trade and the reforms that began under Margaret Thatcher. This again is simplistic twaddle. During the course of the Brexit campaign, one of the most frequently repeated advantages of Brexit was the prospect of beginning to take control of our own trade and escaping the protectionism of the EU. I  for one was accused in one debate by my pro-EU opponent of advocating “Singapore on steroids”.

While the Brexit vote was strong in white working classes areas, the wonderful result on June 23rd was achieved by their alliance with frustrated small businessmen, some trade unionists, a few Labour MPs, a few more Tory MPs and a selection of educated professional types unhappy with the loss of our sovereignty, control of our trade and the top-down nature of the EU.

Of these unlikely bedfellows, the most uniquely British component is the strongly Eurosceptic centre right – one of the legacies of Thatcherism.  Peter Mandelson’s claim that Jeremy Corbyn somehow sabotaged the remain vote  just does not stand up to scrutiny.  Undecided centre-right voters were never going to be  won over by a Labour politician, whether Blairite of Corbynite. Somehow, Mandelson and his ilk still seem unable to come to terms with the fact that plenty of highly educated intelligent people studied the arguments on both sides of the debate and decided that we would be better off out.

Nor, sadly, are they giving up in their attempts to overrule the will  of the people. The European Movement, which was a recipient of substantial CIA funding in the past, is organising a  “March for Europe” on 3rd September. “We need to send a message that 16 million people voted to remain” says their propaganda. Well, we have a message for the European Movement:- over 17 million people voted to leave and we won. That’s called democracy.

Lord Stoddart, a patron and former Chairman of CIB,  recently issued a stark warning to Lord Mandelson and other  Europhile members of the Upper Chamber:-

“My colleagues in the Lords would do well to remember that the Brexit vote was the largest vote for anything in the history of our nation.  According to a study by the University of East Anglia, had Vote Leave been a political party, it would have won a huge landslide of 421 Parliamentary seats.  That would equate to 65% of all seats and 73% of seats in England and Wales.  Mess with this massive mandate at your peril!”

Photo by Brian Smithson (Old Geordie)

Trying to change the way we think

This excellent piece by Christopher Booker has also been published in Derek Bennett’s Euro Realist newsletter and is reproduced with permission 

It can be downloaded as a pdf here

The metric system – love it or loathe it, this is the strange story of how it was imposed on Britain over several decades, by stealth, deception and downright lies.

In recent days, as television news has brought us non-stop reporting on the terrible floods, we have yet again seen evidence of one of the odder things to have happened to Britain in our lifetime. An official of the Environment Agency tells us that some river has burst its banks because it has risen by ‘5.2 metres’, only for a shocked local to tell us that it is ’17 feet higher than normal’.

Some hapless BBC reporter interviewing a flood victim outside his house solemnly informs us that the water is ‘300 millimetres deep’. But only when the homeowner tells us ‘it’s a foot deep in our living
room’ do most of us have an idea of what they are talking about.

What this illustrates us how we now have side by side two quite different systems of weights and measures in this country – one invariably used by government officials and the BBC, the other still used by millions of people because, for most everyday purposes, it seems to be much more sensible and easily comprehensible.

And part of the reason why so many of us now live in two different worlds like this, on something which touches almost every aspect of our lives, lies in a strange saga which has never been properly told.

In the year just ending, anniversaries of glorious events in our island story have come thick and fast – Magna Carta 1215, Agincourt 1415, Waterloo 1815, victory in the Second World War 1945.

But 2015 has also marked two anniversaries from a much less glorious story – one I have been following for 50 years as one of the murkiest episodes in the history of our supposed parliamentary democracy.

This is the story of how politicians worked to replace our old system of weights and measures with the ‘much more sensible’ and ‘rational’ metric system.

I am not here concerned with the pros and cons of the two systems – although I shall touch on that later
– but with the peculiarly dishonest tactics our politicians devised to bring about such a huge change in our British way of life without ever needing to consult our wishes. Precisely because the politicians knew that such a far-reaching move would be highly controversial, they wanted to introduce it without ever allowing it to be debated or voted on by Parliament.

They sought instead to impose it on us, at every stage, by stealth, deception and downright lies. The story began 50 years ago when, in 1965, a Labour government used a Written Answer buried at the back of Hansard to announces its intention to replace the weights and measures used in Britain since the time of the Roman empire (it was after this, not the British empire, that it was known as the ‘imperial system’).

The first lie was a pretence that the switch to metric was to be made in response to the wishes of British ‘industry’. When years later I managed to unearth the relevant documents, it turned out that ‘industry’ had said nothing of the kind. Under pressure from a small group of shadowy bureaucrats, the chief trade body representing businesses had certainly expressed interest in the possibility of such a change, since it
would affect all its members. But it merely said that many were ‘concerned’ by its implications.

In 1968 came the second lie when, as the then technology minister Tony Benn gabbled to MPs a list of his plans for the future, he slipped in his wish to see Britain ‘fully metric’ by 1975.

But this change, he insisted, would be entirely voluntary. ‘Compulsion’, he twice promised, ‘is not part of the process’ (hence no need for parliamentary debate). Within months this was given the lie when his government issued a statutory diktat – the first of many – making it a criminal offence to sell drugs except in metric.

In 1969 it set up a ‘Metrication Board’ to ‘co-ordinate the process’ and ruled that, after 1975, It would become illegal for anything but the metric system to be taught in schools. During the 1970 election campaign, when I first revealed all this in a magazine article, one reader was so incensed that she badgered her would-be Tory MP into promising that Parliament would, for the first time, debate the subject.

It was only a short debate (which I attended). But when other Tory backbenchers heard of what was going on, they were furious that such an immense change to British life was being smuggled in by stealth,

In 1972, when Edward Heath was taking us into the European Common Market, he learned that Brussels planned a directive to ensure that all its members must use the metric system. He pleaded that this be kept under wraps until Britain was safely in.

But in 1973, after we had entered, Heath issued a Metrication White Paper, based onthe wholly fictitious claim that Britain was onlyadopting the metric system in response to ‘two polls’ of industry. No such polls had ever taken place.

By 1978, under Margaret Thatcher, the Tories were pledged to have no more of it. No sooner was she elected in 1979 than she scrapped the Metrication Board. In 1980 Brussels hit back by at last issuing its long-planned directive requiring all members of the ‘European Community’ to use the metric system (all except Britain and Ireland already did).

In 1985 the Thatcher government responded with a new Weights and Measures Act, confirming that the ‘imperial’ system would continue to be legal. In 1989, Brussels issued a new directive designed to whip Britain into line – although, to soften the pill, this still allowed us to continue for a time using miles on road signs and pints (but only for beer, cider and milk).

It was this directive which 20 years ago in 1995 – our second anniversary – led to the Major government issuing a swathe of new statutory instruments making it a criminal offence to sell goods of any kind, including fruit and veg, except in metric.

Indeed the government went much further than the directive envisaged, by requiring the metrication of every aspect of British life, from evidence given in courtrooms to speed limits on our canals, along with thousands of local bylaws. When some of us pointed out that this all resulted from Brussels directives, the minister who signed most of these diktats into British law, Michael Heseltine, insisted that they had ‘nothing to do with Europe’. This had been British policy, he said, ‘since the Sixties’. But the very documents he signed were being put into law under the 1972 European Communities Act – again without Parliament being given the chance to discuss them.

When I was interviewed by a young BBC presenter at this time, he scornfully suggested that no one under the age of 40 had any idea what feet and inches were. When I asked him how tall he was, he replied ‘five feet, 10 inches’. That bit of the interview hit the cutting room floor.

Nothing angered many British people more than when, in 2000, these laws made it illegal for market traders to sell fruit and veg by the old weights which most of their customers preferred – and this came to a head when a Sunderland stallholder Steve Thoburn was charged with the criminal offence of selling a ‘pound of bananas’.

He and four other ‘Metric Martyrs’ took their case to the Court of Appeal, arguing that since, under the ancient rule that no Act of Parliament can be overruled by one passed previously, the 1985 Weights and Measures Act could not be negated by an edict issued under the European Communities Act of 1972.

To get round this argument, Lord Justice Laws craftily devised a wholly new legal principle. He ruled that the European Communities Act was a ‘constitutional statute’, so important that it could not be overturned by anything which came after it. Many larger businesses, such as those making tinned foods, welcomed the confusion created by the new laws, as they reduced the contents of their old ‘1lb’ tins (454 grams) to 400 grams, hoping customers charged the same price would not notice.

Many other manufacturers, such as those making sweets and chocolate, played the same trick – even though the only reason why weights and measure legislation was backed by the criminal law was that this was to prevent customers being sold ‘short measure’.

At least it still remained legal for shopkeepers forced to sell in metric to print the ‘imperial’ equivalent next to it. But in 2002 Brussels issued a new directive designed to make even this illegal, and again the UK dutifully complied. It would become a crime for retailers to make any mention of the old weights and measures at all.

The new laws continued to throw up ever more anomalies until, in 2007, many giant US corporations, such as IBM and Hewlett-Packard, were warned by a clever pressure group, the British Weights and Measures Association, that this new EU law would make it illegal for them to export anything to the EU unless its packaging, sales literature and much else was given only in metric. It would even become illegal for them to refer to a ’42-inch’ television screen.

The US firms protested so loudly – estimating that it could cost them billions of dollars – that Brussels at last backed down. Not only did it scrap its demand relating to US goods, it also withdrew its law banning any mention of non-metric measures within the EU itself.

So embarrassed was Brussels by the anger its metrication laws had aroused in Britain that its trade commissioner issued a remarkable statement. He wanted the British to know that ‘imperial measures’, such as the mile and the pint, were ‘the very essence of the Britishness that Europeans know and love’. The British could continue using imperial equivalents alongside metric weights and measures as long as they wished.

On this last, carefully phrased fudge, 40 years of deceit and chicanery more or less came to an end. Never again, it seemed, would a greengrocer be charged with a criminal offence for shouting ‘lovely toms, a pound a pound’ to customers who hadn’t a clue what was meant by ‘half a kilo’.

But one legacy of this bid to impose metrication on the British people without ever consulting their wishes is that we are left with a strange hybrid system which is sometimes one thing and sometimes another. Fervent supporters of metric scornfully insist that it is so much more ‘rational’ than that
ridiculously antiquated system rightly consigned to the dustbin of history.

They try to overlook that the most modern and successful economy in the world, the USA, which landed a man on the moon in feet and inches, still somehow manages to survive with the imperial system.

And how many realise that the official EU definition of a metre is that it is ‘the length equal to 1,650,763 wavelengths in vacuum of the radiation corresponding to the transition between the levels 2p(10) and 5d(5) of the krypton atom’ You can’t get more ‘rational’ than that.

In truth the only way metric is more user-friendly than imperial is simply that it divides and multiplies by 10, But one thing I have learned from 50 years of observing all this is how, for everyday practical purposes, such as cooking or carpentry or measuring out a carpet, imperial wins every time.

We see this, as I said at the start, whenever reporters from the rigorously-metricated BBC come up against members of the public, as when they interview flood victims. The reporter may dutifully tell us that the floodwater in someone’s house has reached a depth of ‘300 millimetres’. But only when the victim tells us ‘it’s a foot deep’ do we really have a picture of what is meant – just as when we are told that some new-born royal baby weighs ‘6 pounds, 8 ounces’, rather than ‘2.72 kilograms’ or even ‘2720 grams’.

Despite half a century of trying to change the way we think, I suspect that, for practical purposes, those dear old pounds, feet and inches will be with us for a long time yet.

Photo by eamoncurry123

Another letter from our President to the Leicester Mercury

Over the years, our President, George West, has not found it easy to get his letters published in his loval newspaper, the Leicester Mercury. However, he has had more success in recent weeks and a second letter appeared recently.

I was delighted to read Dr Franco Bianchini’s letter in Thursday’s Mailbox if only to learn that as a Professor of Cultural Policy and Planning that he is alive and active. We met during the time I was a member of the Cultural Strategy Partnership Executive that was part of Leicester City’s departmental empire building. We moved mountains of paper but achieved little. It was a productive time when I was more productively involved in organising successful Jazz Festivals  and  organising St George’s Day celebrations in the city with little support.

I fear that Dr.Bianchini is not as well renowned for his knowledge of life before we were all inveigled into the European Community.  He wrote “Many British people are benefitting from EU membership to learn languages like French, Spanish and Portuguese and to familiarise themselves with countries with different histories, legal systems and cultural traditions”. Do you know what? Before we entered the European Community I was taught French and German whilst at school. I also travelled to Holland, Belgium and Spain with a UK passport, still later  in use, and enjoyed those cultural changes.

As for learning about the history of other countries, our children should first be taught the history of Great Britain and our own Common Law legal system. Because of the present inadequate history curriculum we have published a booklet “Generations Betrayed”. Over the years we have produced and circulated masses of leaflets exposing the EU whether related, for example, to the closure of our Post Offices, privatisation of the NHS, the Common Agricultural policy madness of paying farmers not to produce any food crops and so many other topics.

I am unsure why he cannot see any connection with Nye Bevan’s comment about fish whilst the EU has been responsible for the biggest man-made disaster in the North Sea by its policy of throwing thousands and thousands of tons of dead fish back into the sea year upon year on the pretext that it conserves fish stocks whilst many people go hungry. Yes it did take an EU genius to inflict that policy. As for Margaret Thatcher, she was ill advised by her Ministers over the EU. Once she realised and made her Bruges speech, her eurofanatic ministers felt compelled to have her removed.

We can continue to have access to the Single Market when we leave so employers have nothing to fear on that score. We will all certainly benefit by removing the political control over us all and restore the supremacy of our own Parliament.

George West
President, Campaign for an Independent Britain

A letter from our President to the Leicester Mercury

Come the New Year we will be steeped in preparations for the EU referendum requiring evidence based facts and not EU biased wool pulled over eyes, especially by Little Europeans who would have us believe that we are too small and cannot stand on our own feet. The pages of Mailbox were filled at one time by letters from local European Movement members who predicted that it would be a disaster to stay out of the euro. They have been proven hopelessly wrong but no doubt they will again try to strike fear where and when they can. What they cannot do is silence the growing awareness of the damage done to Britain and its industries over the past forty years. A vote to stay in the EU will commit our children and generations to come to ever closer political control no matter how much our present Prime Minister tries to convince us otherwise.

I would like to mention two quotations that remain in my mind, one from the Conservative party:-
In my lifetime all our problems have come from Mainland Europe and all our solutions have come from the English speaking nations of the world” (Margaret Thatcher)

and one from the Labour party:- “This island is made mainly from coal and surrounded by fish. Only an organising genius could produce a shortage of coal and fish at the same time.” (Aneurin Bevan)

The national organisation financed only by public donations founded in 1969 for a free UK that I am elected to head, will continue to campaign to inform and restore pride in Britain as a self governing nation engaging in friendly relationships with nations of the whole world, especially the Commonwealth. We have put up with our unelected European Union masters long enough. It is time to leave and more usefully spend the £33,000,000 net we give away to the EU every day. They might not miss us but will desperately try to hang on to our money whilst pretending they might change their ways