A letter from our Chairman – the lethal austerity of the €uro

Sir,

From the beginning of this year the Greek government stopped publishing the usual monthly statistics of births and deaths. Continuing to do so would give a truer cost of the EU-imposed austerity programme than any massaged economic statistics.

In 2017 the annual total of deaths was 123, 700 as against 118,623 in 2016. But in 2013 the total was only 70,830 and before the financial crisis the death rate was usually around 60,000 . So twice as many people are dying than used to be the case.

The reason for this massive increase in mortality is the austerity imposed by the EU and the IMF, which dissolved the Greek NHS. Poverty, hunger, lack of heating and increased suicides account for the rest. These figures measure a terrible increase in human suffering, taking place in a modern European country. But that’s all right with the BBC and broadcast media because it’s happening in the EU which, they believe, is such a wonderful thing and rather fashionable on the left of politics. Whilst the UK remains an EU member, our government is part of the government of the EU, responsible for the deaths in which Europhile MPs and MEPs are also complicit.

Whoever the Greek people elect to government, it is the EU authorities which dictate policy, such as the privatisation of public assets – ports, airports, electricity etc. They are also insisting that the government must speed up the auctioning of homes on which people can no longer afford the mortgages. Wages and pensions have been drastically cut and direct and indirect tax rates increased.

To prevent interference with the forced sales, electronic auctions have been introduced. Around 5 million taxpayers lack the funds to pay taxes and the state can now auction properties for debts over 500 euros.

I would not have credited this information, if it had not come from an unimpeachable source. Ambassador Leonidas Chrysanthopoulos (Retired) had a distinguished career in his country’s foreign ministry. He is now a member of the secretariat of the Front for a Free Greece. Last year I hosted a conference which he addressed and thought surely “things could only get better” for the Greek people. But they have not.

Those who presently complain of austerity here need to be reminded that our fate would have been very much more like that of the Greek nation, if people like Tony Blair and Ken Clarke had got their way and locked us into the prison house of the euro currency. It is time to leave the whole tyrannical project behind and perhaps to divert at least a small portion of our bloated foreign aid budget to the worthwhile relief of the unfortunate citizens of Greece.

Yours faithfully

 

Edward Spalton

 

Our Chairman is confident that these figures are  accurate. Do feel free to copy this letter and send it to your local newspapers.

If you want to find out more abut the effects of austerity on Greece, this video (in  Greek but with English subtitles) lasts an hour and a half but provides some deep insights into modern Greek history.

Ambassador Chrysanthopoulos (depicted above) spoke at last years Annual Rally. You can watch his speech here

The United Kingdom as a third country

Some  people are confused about the meaning of this term with regard to our extrication from the EU and have become needlessly indignant.  It does not mean “third rate” or “Third World”.   In the EU situation  in international law, the phrase means more or less what “third party” does in an ordinary insurance policy or other legal document – but it refers to a country or state which, in this case,  is not a member of the EU or its associated organisations such as the European Economic Area (EEA).

Background

This non-membership is exactly what Mrs. May demanded in her Lancaster House speech of January 2017.  She wishes to replace our EU membership  with a completely new but unspecified “deep and special” relationship which can only come into being after we have left the EU.  The EU does not “give” us third country status.

We acquire it automatically through leaving at our own request.   Yet this seems to have come as a bit of a surprise to David Davis.

I started to take the Daily Express when it was the first national paper to advocate leaving the EU, so I was rather surprised to read this article in its edition of Wednesday 10th January which suggests either that Mr. Davis is ill-informed or that the reporter misunderstood him.

Row over EU giving UK 3rd country status

David Davis has attacked a Brussels threat to punish British business ahead of Brexit trade talks.

The Brexit Secretary has written to Theresa May raising concerns about EU planning for a “no deal” giving Britain “third country status”  in what appears to be an act of bad faith.

Mr. Davis told the Prime Minister he would urge the EU to drop the measures which would require UK firms to relocate to Europe or risk contracts being terminated in the event of no deal.

He said he had sought legal advice but the chances of a successful challenge were “low” and could be “high risk politically and financially”

But he said he would urge the European Commission’s Brexit task force to withdraw the statements in light of the deal reached last month to start trade talks. Mr. Davis said that EU agencies have issued guidance to businesses stating the UK will become a “third country” after March 2019 with no reference to a future Trade deal.

The guidance says “compliance activity” such as quality control of goods “ would need to be based in the EU or European Economic Area.

Other statements on legal services and the transport industry do not take into account a transition period or trade deal, he said.

Mr. Davis called the moves “potential breaches of the UK’s rights as (an EU) member  state” and insisted “we cannot let these actions go unchallenged “. John Longworth of Leave Means Leave added that  the EU’s negotiating team is increasingly out of step with the mood of many of the EU27 national governments who recognise the importance for their own economies  that a free trade deal is reached with the UK…..”

Meaning of Third Country Status

The Department for Exiting the EU employs some 400 highly paid specialists and the expertise of the Foreign Office and our Representation in Brussels are claimed to be world class, so it is surprising that nobody  took the trouble to  look up some elementary rules of international law on the internet and tell Mr. Davis.

oxfordindex.oup.com/view/10.0903/01/authority

Pacta tertiis nec nocunt nec prosunt – Treaties neither harm nor benefit third parties. A maxim meaning that non-parties to a treaty cannot claim benefits under it…   And, once we are out of the EU, we are no longer a party to any of its treaties.

 https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/res_inter-alios-acta

Res inter alios acta – a thing done between others – to which a given person or entity was not (or is no longer) party .

 From “Third Parties and the law of treaties  – Max Planck UNYB 6 (2002)

Basic Classical Rules

 The relationship between third parties and treaties is defined by a general formula pacta tertiis nec nocunt nec prosunt (see above). This principle has been recognised in states’ practice as fundamental and its existence has never been questioned.. For states non-parties to the treaty, the treaty is res inter alios acta (see above). It has been reflected in numerous cases before the World Court. For example in the German Interests in Polish Silesia case the PCIJ *observed that “ (a) treaty only creates law as between states which are party to it; in case of doubt no rights can be deduced from it in favour of third states.

 Lord McNair, in the Law of Treaties (1961, 309 Harvard Research Article 18) ( a) a treaty may not impose obligations upon a state which is no longer party thereto….”

*Permanent Court of international Justice

The UK as a Vassal State

By  demanding a “Hard Brexit”  from March 29 2019, the government has placed itself in the position of a supplicant to the EU for a “transition” or “implementation” period so that Mrs. May’s unspecified “deep and special” relationship may be agreed without disruption of trade.

If what we have been told is correct, all existing  EU laws will continue to apply during this period and new ones could be sprung on us without our having any say at all – complete vassal status.

Conclusion

There are strong economic reasons for both sides to come  to a mutually beneficial agreement.

However there is no good reason to suppose that the EU will abolish its external frontier procedures with a newly independent UK.  If it did that, not only would it breach its own principal trading rules, but also the World Trade Organisation would be overwhelmed with complaints from other third country states.  Every other country in the world would be demanding that the EU did the same for them.

 

Crony capitalism – how it works:- a letter from our Chairman

This letter from our Chairman appeared in the Derby Telegraph.

Whilst Mr. Corbyn is rightly making a great fuss about the terms on which private providers like Carillion contract for the provision of public services, the fashion for this type of arrangement reached giddying heights under Labour government.

One of the most notorious contracts was the sale in 2001 by the Inland Revenue of two thirds of its office buildings for £370 million which they leased back for £144 million per annum, including maintenance costs. Over the period of the whole contract period , the actual cost is estimated to be £4.2 billion. The much increased value of the office premises will benefit the contractor, a firm based in a tax haven!

Why does any government make such a silly bargain? Our old friend, the EU comes into it. Under the Growth & Stability Pact, governments are required to restrict their borrowing. By making the contractor put up the necessary money, the government keeps the debt off the public accounts. Of course, the contractors pay a much higher rate of interest than the government would have done and then have to add a profit on top. The increased cost is spread over many years and few people notice but the taxpayer is far worse off.

There is another advantage for those in the know. Ministers and senior civil servants, who awarded large lucrative contracts during their careers, retire from public office and spend a year with their inflation-proof pensions. They then reappear as directors and consultants for the contractors, using their insider knowledge to sell their services to their former colleagues in government. This process is known as “the revolving door”. They come back in again to their old ministries, demonstrating that private finance contracts provide very well-paid second careers for those who have left the public service.

The privatisation of Royal Mail demonstrates another aspect of EU influence. The EU’s Postal Directives decreed that letter and parcel deliveries must be part of a European market in postal services and not a nationally provided public service. Many people of widely ranging views supported the retention of this national institution. The Labour and Trade Union Movement did so too but suppressed the fact that this privatisation was the result of EU laws and continued to support EU membership.

Back in 1983 Michael Foot was the Labour leader and his policies were very similar to those of Mr Corbyn. Ken Clarke remarked then “The great thing about Europe is that it makes most of Labour’s policies illegal” . At least Mr Foot drew the obvious conclusion – that we should leave the then EEC. So it is strange today to see all but a handful of Labour MPs trying to wreck the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill. It has now passed its third reading in the Commons which is one step along the way of removing those EU influences which drove the process of privatisation.

Yours faithfully,

Edward Spalton

Ireland’s bluff called – a letter from our Chairman

This letter was sent by our Chairman, Edward Spalton, to the Scottish Daily Record in response to an article which appeared in the paper on 27th November.

Sir,

( I was visiting, so chanced to read your article “Dublin Down” p4, Monday 27 November).

For an EU document, Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union is unusually short and easy to understand.

It is quite clear that the arrangements for a country to leave the EU are to be agreed by the European Council under the Qualified Majority procedure. The Council’s decision is then subject to approval by the EU parliament.

Neither the Irish government nor any single member state has a power of veto. I am no longer surprised at the ignorance of our politicians which allows the threat of a veto by the Irish Prime Minister to go unchallenged.  But I live in hopes of better informed newspaper correspondents!

Unwillingness to consult original EU documents is widespread in high places. At a recent private meeting of top business leaders in London, nobody put up their hand when asked if they had even skim-read an EU Free Trade Agreement. Former civil servants who were present said this was true of ministers they had served.

Of course, most such documents  are long and crashingly boring but this is not true of Article 50.

Yours faithfully

Edward Spalton

Straws in the wind

Apart from signs of possible movement in the stalled negotiations with the EU on trade, events are beginning to push into reality those matters which have previously been merely the subject of rhetoric and speculation.

Whatever plans the government has, it will have to start giving practical information to businesses in the early new year about its intentions. In our extended article The Complexities of Brexit, we pointed out the urgency of the situation for chemical manufacturers, farmers, food producers and other businesses which have long production cycles or investment programmes which reach into the post Brexit era.

Whilst trade associations like to avoid publicity which might upset the government and to conduct their negotiations in private, the urgency of the situation is pushing these matters into the public sphere. Two articles from City AM of 22nd November demonstrate this.

EASYJET PLAN COULD SHAKE UP SHAREHOLDINGS by Rebecca Smith

EASYJET yesterday set out plans which could force UK shareholders to sell their stakes after Brexit, as it prepares to comply with foreign ownership rules.

Under EU law, the airline needs to ensure majority control and ownership by EU nationals after Britain leaves in order for it to keep operating intra-EU. Yesterday it unveiled plans to amend its articles of association which currently give directors the power to limit the ownership of the firm’s shares by by non UK nationals. Easyjet intends to change this so they apply to non EU shareholders, which will exclude UK shareholders once the UK has left the EU – giving it the power to force UK shareholders to divest their shares if need be.

The airline will put the changes to shareholders at its annual general meeting in February, saying the switch-up will ensure that Easyjet is able to remain EU-owned and controlled at all times after the UK has left the EU.

The carrier said it has “no current intention” of using the proposed powers……

BREXIT BREAKTHROUGH NEEDED BY EARLY 2018 TO HELP BUSINESSES.

By Jasper Jolly & Alys Key

THE GOVERNMENT must secure a Brexit transition deal by the end of the first quarter of 2018 before businesses implement “no deal” contingency plans, according to the head of the Institute of Directors (IoD).

Speaking at the lobby group’s annual dinner last night, IoD director general Stephen Martin said businesses “are concerned about what happens if a breakthrough is not made at the next round of talks in December”.

He said “It’s as simple as this – we are now only 16 months away from leaving the EU. We need the discussion to move on to our future trading relationship and critically what happens when the Article 50 timeline runs out in early 2019.

But he praise IoD members for their “determination” in preparing for every Brexit eventuality, saying that businesses have upheld their end of the bargain and now need the politicians to “deliver” for them.

IGNORANCE ABOUNDING IN HIGH PLACES

A colleague, who has been quietly lobbying trade associations for months, decided it was time to speak to his MP. During the course of their discussion, he mentioned EFTA (The European Free Trade Association) and was astonished to find that this shadow minister did not know what it was. He had never heard of it. Over many years of campaigning, we have often been surprised at the lack of knowledge by MPs of all parties concerning the European project. A national referendum and over a year’s intense debate on the result appear to have been insufficient to disperse the fog of ignorance on even such a basic matter as this.

It is not just politicians either. At a private meeting of senior business people, not one participant raised a hand when asked if they had ever downloaded and skim-read an EU Free Trade Agreement. Former civil servants at the meeting said that this was also true of ministers they had served.

Mind you, half an hour of reading the sort of leaden prose which the EU produces is enough to sap the will to live! Considering the very definitive statements made by leading spokesmen and media personalities, it would be interesting to know how many of their very emphatic opinions were based on direct acquaintance with the text. The Devil is always in the detail.

A WIND OF CHANGE

Commenting on a report of this meeting, our good friend John Ashworth of Fishing for Leave wrote “I haven’t been home long from three days in London and I too can’t say what I have been up to, but I can confirm there is a wind of change. I have a lot of work to do now, but I am happy with the three days, never satisfied enough. But movement is at last happening, so to all readers, keep the pressure up.

“The two factors which had the most effect on them were, on the one hand, a most extraordinary level of ignorance and, on the other, an almost complete inability to listen. If anything, the stories that have leaked out on these aspects are somewhat under-stated” – yes, spot on”.

 

UKIP Launches “Save our services”

A report by Edward Spalton

CIB is, of course, a non-party organisation but, as I had received an invitation to their press conference I thought I should attend. I wanted to meet Henry Bolton, their new leader, on this first public event since he took office. It is seventeen years since I left UKIP to campaign on a cross-party basis but I met some old friends and was pleased that several people, whom I had not met before, told me they appreciated CIB, mentioning recent articles on the website.

The event was well-attended, briskly and cheerfully organised. The first speaker was Mike Hookem MEP, who included a video presentation of his work amongst veterans who had fallen on hard times and were not receiving the help either from government or local authorities which the Military Covenant says they “should” receive – but do not. Service charities were doing their best to fill the gaps but it was not enough.

He called for a Minister and a department, like the American Veterans’ Administration, to be in charge of welfare for former service personnel and to help them back into civilian life. It was no good telling local authorities what they “should” do, it needed to be “must”. He also called for ex service personnel with good records to be given favourable consideration for employment in the police and other public services where their skills and discipline would be an advantage to the community.

Henry Bolton took the podium and ranged further and wider, mentioning the sharp cuts which had been made not only to the armed forces but to the police, reducing our defences against internal terrorism and criminality as well as external hostility, at the very time when they were all increasing. The government had not signed up on Monday 13th November to integration of British forces with the increasingly unified EU military command under the PESCO agreement, which would suck resources away from NATO. It had signed up to much else and EU absorption still remained a threat.

Whilst British armed forces should be capable of joint operations with our neighbours, they must always retain the ability of independent action – or we were not a sovereign country. Tied in with the developing EU army and trapped in sourcing our military supplies under EU tendering rules, we would not only be unable to act independently in the field but forbidden to maintain the necessary British industrial base for supplying our forces. EU arms suppliers, under political direction, could in effect, choke off any significant operations by British forces of which the EU did not approve – by simply withholding supplies or, for instance, the use of aircraft on which we had an expectation to rely.

I was able to ask Henry Bolton one short question. Did he think that Political Correctness in local authorities, particularly left wing authorities, was pushing the welfare of ex-servicemen and women to the end of the queue? He replied that authorities of all political colours were negligent in this matter.

From what had been said by government, it appeared that the needs of returning Jihadists for housing, “re-education” and employment would take precedence over the welfare of our own ex-service people. This was monstrous. Those known to have been in arms for Jihadism should be charged with adhering to our country’s foes – what used to be called treason, rather than handled with kid gloves for the sake of “community relations”.

I think we will be hearing more of Henry Bolton and many people will like what he has to say.